Nurse Writing Services

Capella 4020 Assessment 4

New Samples

Struggling With Your Assessments? Get Help From Our Tutors

    Capella 4020 Assessment 4

    Capella 4020 Assessment 4 Improvement Plan Tool Kit

    Student Name

    Capella University

    NURS-FPX 4020 Improving Quality of Care and Patient Safety

    Prof. Name

    Date

    Improvement Plan Tool Kit-Medication Error

    In today’s age of transformation, the healthcare industry heavily relies on technology. This encompasses aspects including interoperability for seamless exchange of information, robust privacy and security measures to protect patient data, advancements for ensuring patient safety, and technology-enabled approaches to patient and caregiver education. Our evaluation focuses on four areas; interoperability, privacy and security measures, patient safety initiatives and educating patients and caregivers. We have extensively referenced a range of resources available on Google Scholar to gain insights into the impact of technology adoption in healthcare.

    Our objective is to understand both the challenges and opportunities that arise from these advancements. By doing so we can effectively utilize technology to enhance outcomes, improve their overall experience and revolutionize healthcare delivery as a whole.

    General Organizational Safety and Quality Best Practices

    Youmbi, K. V., Arya, A., Conger, A., Hood, D., Mai, J., Patel-House, S., & Then, M. (2023). Practical strategies for ensuring safety of medication overrides from automated dispensing cabinets. Journal of the American Pharmacists Association, 63(1), 193–197. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.japh.2022.09.015 

    This study offers essential insights into how healthcare organizations are implementing safety practices surrounding medication overrides on automated dispensing machines, as recommended by the Institute of Safe Medication Practices (ISMP) and the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP). The resource holds significant value for pharmacists, pharmacy technicians, nurse managers, and others involved in medication administration, as it elucidates how various organizations manage medication overrides.

    This knowledge can be directly used to refine their own practices, potentially mitigating risks associated with misuse of the override feature. From a patient safety perspective, this resource is pivotal in its potential to reduce medication errors. By informing more standardized policies on medication overrides and promoting regular review of such overrides, patient safety can be notably improved. Furthermore, the study’s findings can guide health care organizations towards establishing best practices, thereby enhancing the overall quality of care in relation to medication administration.

    Warren, C., Kramer, J., & Burgess, L. (2023). Operationalizing a medication safety gap assessment for a large health system. HCA Healthcare Journal of Medicine, 4(2). https://doi.org/10.36518/2689-0216.1566 

    Capella 4020 Assessment 4

    This resource examines the compliance level of acute care facilities with the medication safety best practices set by the Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP). It highlights areas where improvements are needed and underlines the necessity of strong change management leadership at a local level. This article serves as a valuable tool for hospital administrators, pharmacists, and nursing managers as it aids in benchmarking their current practices against those of other acute care facilities. By analyzing the level of implementation and identifying practices that have been overlooked, health professionals can formulate strategies to address these gaps. Understanding the success rate of best practice implementation across various hospitals also allows for sharing of knowledge and strategies for overcoming barriers.

    This article gives a clear roadmap of practices that require more attention in order to prevent medication errors and increase patient safety. By focusing on these areas, hospitals can minimize the instances of medication errors and provide safer patient care. Furthermore, this study emphasizes the importance of ongoing improvement and the role of leadership in driving change. This recognition aligns with the drive towards not only maintaining but enhancing the quality of healthcare delivery.

    Lucas, S. R., Pollak, E., & Makowski, C. (2022). A failure in the medication delivery system-how disclosure and systems investigation improve patient safety. Journal of Healthcare Risk Management.  https://doi.org/10.1002/jhrm.21529

    Capella 4020 Assessment 4

    This article dissects a significant medication error incident at Vanderbilt University Medical Center and presents a proactive action plan to curb such unfortunate occurrences in future. This document serves as a wake-up call for hospital leaders, nurse practitioners, and medication safety officers, among other healthcare professionals. The account of a real-world, tragic error, underpinned by a system failure, underscores the paramount importance of stringent medication safety protocols. By turning a grave mistake into a learning experience, the healthcare community can use this case study to drive home the significance of medication safety and encourage adherence to proper protocol during training sessions.

    Through this detailed analysis of a medication error incident, the resource equips healthcare institutions with valuable insights to prevent similar occurrences, thereby enhancing patient safety. Additionally, the resource’s emphasis on transparency and disclosure in the event of errors highlights an essential strategy in improving healthcare quality. By promoting open conversations about mistakes, institutions can foster a culture of learning and continuous improvement, ultimately working towards reducing patient safety risks related to medication administration. The action plan is incredibly valuable, for healthcare organizations as it offers a roadmap, for strengthening measures that ensure medication safety.

    Medication Error Prevention and Reconciliation

    Chiewchantanakit, D., Meakchai, A., Pituchaturont, N., Dilokthornsakul, P., & Dhippayom, T. (2019). The effectiveness of medication reconciliation to prevent medication error: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Research in Social and Administrative Pharmacy, 16(7). https://doi.org/10.1016/j.sapharm.2019.10.004 

    This study investigates the impact of medication reconciliation (MR) on minimizing medication errors in Thailand.  The researchers conducted an analysis by reviewing databases to gather relevant studies. They examined seven studies involving 1581 patients. Found that those who underwent MR had a lower risk of medication errors by 75% across all stages of care. Notably the benefits were more evident among patients receiving care and those treated in secondary care hospitals. The study concludes that MR proves effective in mitigating medication errors and suggests the need for strategies to maximize its potential.

    Healthcare providers, those working in middle income countries like Thailand can greatly benefit from this resource as it highlights the positive impact of MR on reducing medication errors. It provides insights into how to implement MR for specific patient groups such as ambulatory patients and those receiving care in secondary care hospitals. By highlighting the potential of MR to decrease medication errors this research significantly contributes to improving safety.

    It encourages healthcare settings to adopt MR as a practice thereby enhancing the quality of medication management. By identifying populations that could potentially gain advantages from medication reconciliation (MR) this research can assist healthcare organizations in developing more tailored and efficient approaches to managing medications. Consequently, these customized interventions may result in results and improved overall healthcare standards.

    Capella 4020 Assessment 4

    Alrabadi, N., Shawagfeh, S., Haddad, R., Mukattash, T., Abuhammad, S., Al-rabadi, D., Abu Farha, R., AlRabadi, S., & Al-Faouri, I. (2021). Medication errors: A focus on nursing practice. Journal of Pharmaceutical Health Services Research, 12(1), 78–86. https://doi.org/10.1093/jphsr/rmaa025 

    The research paper highlights the importance of strategies in nursing to effectively handle medication mistakes. It advocates for an approach that utilizes education, communication, involving patients and promoting a culture that does not assign blame. Nurses play a role in implementing these guidelines and preventing medication errors, which ultimately improves safety and the quality of healthcare. This study offers insights, for healthcare professionals, particularly nurses to better comprehend and address medication errors. The outlined strategies offer practical solutions for improving patient safety and healthcare service quality. Moreover, the article emphasizes the vital role nurses play in this aspect of patient care, encouraging their active participation in reducing medication errors.

    The study contributes to patient safety by suggesting practical strategies that healthcare institutions can implement to reduce medication errors. By encouraging the creation of a blame-free workspace, it fosters an environment where errors can be openly reported and addressed, ultimately leading to improved patient safety and quality of healthcare services. Furthermore, by highlighting the importance of nurses’ role in managing medication errors, it advocates for the empowerment of nurses, which can lead to improved healthcare quality.

    Hawkins, S. F., & Morse, J. M. (2022). Untenable expectations: Nurses’ work in the context of medication administration, error, and the organization. Global Qualitative Nursing Research. https://doi.org/10.1177/23333936221131779 

    Capella 4020 Assessment 4

    This research delves into the function of nurses in the process of dispensing medication, examining its connection to incidences of medication errors and the wider organizational framework. The investigators utilized a secondary review of ethnographic data, which encompassed non-participant observations, casual interviews with nurses, administrators, and pharmacists, as well as an examination of institutional documents.The study uncovered that nurses’ work is not straightforward and linear but follows a chaotic and complex pattern.

    This challenges the notion that nursing tasks can be neatly categorized into linear processes. The study introduces a model that illustrates how nurses work intersects, with contextual factors providing deeper insights into the potential causes of chaotic work days for nurses. The researchers emphasize the importance of medication practices for nurses. Highlight the limited understanding of the contextual factors surrounding medication administration. They argue that current efforts to reduce medication errors, such as streamlining processes and minimizing interruptions during medication administration may prove ineffective due to the nature of nurses work and medication administration.

    This resource thoroughly examines the complexities involved in nurses roles in medication administration shedding light on the challenges that contribute to medication errors. By offering this nuanced understanding it provides insights that can inform strategies for preventing errors making it particularly useful, for healthcare professionals and administrators. The study emphasizes the need to acknowledge factors and consider the complexity of nurses’ work when developing effective strategies to mitigate these risks. These aspects are often overlooked in approaches aimed at reducing errors.The research suggests that it is important to move from approaches and instead focus on strategies that take into account the intricate nature of medication administration. This shift has the potential to enhance safety and improve the quality of healthcare.

    Implementation Strategies and Technological Solutions

    Trivedi, K. K., Schaffzin, J. K., Deloney, V. M., Aureden, K., Carrico, R., Garcia-Houchins, S., Garrett, J. H., Glowicz, J., Lee, G. M., Maragakis, L. L., Moody, J., Pettis, A. M., Saint, S., Schweizer, M. L., Yokoe, D. S., & Berenholtz, S. (2023). Implementing strategies to prevent infections in acute-care settings. Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, 1–15. https://doi.org/10.1017/ice.2023.103 

    In this document we present a range of strategies, models and frameworks aimed at enhancing healthcare epidemiology and infection prevention and control. These strategies are designed to address the gap between knowledge and action in healthcare practices providing guidance on delivering high quality care with a focus on preventing healthcare associated infections (HAIs). The resource emphasizes the importance of utilizing implementation methods. It advocates for the incorporation of these approaches by infection prevention and control teams, healthcare epidemiologists, and specialized groups. This acknowledgment underscores the importance of harmonizing these strategies with an organization’s unique context, considering elements like backing, information resources, and readiness for transformation.

    This guide offers insights into the implementation of strategies for healthcare epidemiology and infection prevention and control. By exploring models and frameworks discussed within it, healthcare professionals and institutions can customize their practices to enhance safety and reduce infection rates. Suggesting ways to bridge the knowing-doing gap, it offers practical solutions to align real-world practices with evidence-based recommendations. By offering practical guidance on implementing prevention efforts for healthcare-associated infections, this resource can significantly contribute to reducing patient safety risks. It encourages healthcare professionals and organizations to consider their unique contexts and align their strategies accordingly, which can lead to improved healthcare quality and enhanced patient safety.

    Hamad, M. M. E., & Bah, S. (2022). Impact of implementing electronic health records on medication safety at an HIMSS stage 6 hospital: The pharmacist’s perspective. Canadian Journal of Hospital Pharmacy, 75(4), 267–275. https://doi.org/10.4212/cjhp.3223 

    Capella 4020 Assessment 4

    This research aims to explore the impact of introducing Electronic Health Records (EHRs) on medication mistakes at the Royal Commission Hospital in Jubail, Saudi Arabia. This hospital, designated as a Health Information Management System Society (HIMSS) stage 6 hospital, conducted a quasi-experimental time-series study, gathering historical data from periods prior to and post the implementation of EHRs. The researchers found, surprisingly, a rise in medication errors following the integration of EHRs. Nonetheless, the qualitative assessment suggested that the increased rate of reported medication errors may be linked to improved error detection, a result of an advanced medication management process post the integration of EHRs.

    This research contributes to the ongoing discourse around the effectiveness and impact of EHR implementation in healthcare institutions. It provides important insights on how digital tools like EHRs can influence medication management processes, potentially leading to more effective error detection and reporting. While the study found an increase in reported medication errors after EHR implementation, it emphasizes that this may be due to improved detection capabilities rather than a rise in errors per se. This improved detection could enhance patient safety by identifying and rectifying errors more effectively. Therefore, it advocates for the continued use and development of digital tools in healthcare to augment patient safety and care quality.

    Yeruva, A. R. (2023). Providing a personalized healthcare service to the patients using aiops monitoring. Eduvest – Journal of Universal Studies, 3(2), 327–334. https://doi.org/10.59188/eduvest.v3i2.742 

    This resource discusses the significant role technology plays in healthcare, especially during global health crises. It highlights how South Korea used ‘smart city’ technology and government-developed apps to monitor quarantined individuals during the pandemic. India’s National Institute of Animal Biotechnology, Hyderabad, has developed a biosensor capable of identifying viruses in saliva samples. These advancements became possible thanks to the utilization of biosensors and printed circuit boards that can withstand fluctuations in moisture and temperature.

    Capella 4020 Assessment 4

    Furthermore, the healthcare industry is undergoing a transformation with the introduction of a breakthrough known as Artificial Intelligence for IT Operations (AIOps). AIOps involves the detection and resolution of IT issues through the analysis of vast amounts of data, machine learning and other AI technologies. In healthcare AIOps has the potential to train computers in analyzing CT images, monitoring disease progression, evaluating treatment effectiveness for patients and much more.

    This resource provides an overview of technological progressions in healthcare and their practical applications. It offers insights into how technology, AI can revolutionize healthcare practices and effectively manage global health crises. The resource highlights solutions like leveraging AI for IT operations in healthcare settings that greatly enhance safety and overall quality of care. By employing AI technologies, diagnostic accuracy can be improved drastically, real time monitoring of conditions becomes feasible, personalized treatment plans are enabled – all resulting in reduced patient safety risks along with enhanced healthcare outcomes.

    Patient and Caregiver Education

    Murugappan, M. N., King-Kallimanis, B. L., Reaman, G. H., Bhatnagar, V., Horodniceanu, E. G., Bouchkouj, N., & Kluetz, P. G. (2021). Patient-reported outcomes in pediatric cancer registration trials: A US food and drug administration perspective. JNCI: Journal of the National Cancer Institute. https://doi.org/10.1093/jnci/djab087 

    In this research article the authors critically analyze how pediatric patient reported outcome (PRO) data has been used in oncology trials submitted to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) from 1997, to 2020. The main objective was to determine the extent to which these PROs, which provide insights from patient’s perspectives, were taken into consideration during the evaluation of cancer treatments. The study found that out of the 17 reviewed oncology applications 4 included PRO data. These data were often integrated into phase II or phase I/II single arm studies with a number of patients (ranging from 28, to 88). Moreover, these PRO data were not included in product labeling and were mostly used as exploratory endpoints. Symptomatic adverse events were primarily characterized using clinician-reported criteria without additional patient self-report.

    The study offers crucial insights into the current utilization of PROs in pediatric oncology trials, revealing the underutilization of this important perspective in the evaluation of cancer therapeutics. It also highlights the need for improvements in the way adverse symptomatic events are reported and evaluated. Understanding the patient’s perspective is key to improving patient care, education, and engagement in the treatment process.

    Capella 4020 Assessment 4

    This study highlights a significant gap in the current pediatric oncology research landscape, suggesting a potential direction for future improvements in patient and caregiver education incorporating more patient self-reported outcomes in the evaluation of cancer therapeutics. It also stresses the potential value of contemporary PRO symptom libraries like the National Cancer Institute’s Pediatric PRO-CTCAE, which could play a vital role in better understanding and evaluating the patient’s perspective on symptomatic adverse events.

    Catanzaro, M. T. (2022). Antibiotic stewardship for nurses: Using e-learning modules to bridge the education gap. Antimicrobial Stewardship & Healthcare Epidemiology, 2(1). https://doi.org/10.1017/ash.2021.216 

    This research delves into the crucial position that front-line nurses occupy in antibiotic stewardship, addressing issues such as limited education, ineffective communication among providers, and the influence of unit culture. The study aimed to surmount these obstacles by developing and implementing three e-learning modules intended to expand nurses’ comprehension of their responsibilities in antibiotic stewardship, understanding of antibiotic resistance, allergy assessments, and drug side effects, among other things.

    Following these modules, a survey conducted among acute care nurses revealed that 81% believed they should be a part of the antibiotic stewardship team, 72% felt more capable of engaging in stewardship dialogues, and 97% thought the newly acquired knowledge would prove useful in their day-to-day work. Despite this progress, some challenges persist, with 45% of participants pointing to a deficiency in education, and 13% citing the hospital or unit culture as impediments to the efficacy of stewardship initiatives.

    Capella 4020 Assessment 4

    This resource emphasizes the potential of e learning as a resource, for empowering nurses in their responsibilities related to stewardship. It demonstrates how targeted education can boost nurses’ confidence and participation in antibiotic stewardship activities. The involvement of nurses in antibiotic stewardship can have direct implications for patient care, as nurses are often the primary point of contact for patients. More informed and empowered nurses can provide better education to patients and caregivers about antibiotics, resistance, side effects, and the importance of appropriate use. This study, therefore, underscores the importance of continued nurse education as a part of broader patient and caregiver education efforts.

    Shan, Y., Shang, J., Yan, Y., & Ye, X. (2023). Workflow interruption and nurses’ mental workload in electronic health record tasks: An observational study. BMC Nursing, 22(1). https://doi.org/10.1186/s12912-023-01209-9 

    The study investigates the effects of frequent interruptions and various factors on nurses’ mental workload and performance when using Electronic Health Records (EHRs) in a tertiary hospital. During the study researchers observed over 145 shifts. Recorded a total of 2,871 interruptions. These interruptions had an impact on workload and performance often resulting in errors or near misses.

    While some of these errors were self-corrected (around 68.35%) the constant need to switch tasks and handle responsibilities significantly increased workload and negatively affected overall performance. The study suggests strategies to improve performance and reduce workload for nurses such as minimizing disruptive interruptions enhancing the usability of systems and providing targeted training to help nurses effectively manage interruptions while improving their competency with electronic health records (EHRs).

    This resource offers insights into the challenges nurses face when using EHRs in healthcare settings. The findings can inform the development of strategies that aim to enhance efficiency and reduce workload in healthcare environments. Understanding how workflow interruptions and increased mental workload impact healthcare delivery can also contribute to initiatives focused on educating patients and caregivers. By improving workflows and reducing workloads for nurses we can ensure patient care with fewer errors. Additionally, by alleviating workloads for nurses they can actively engage in education activities. Ultimately this study indirectly highlights the importance of improvements within healthcare settings to promote patient education experiences, for both patients and caregivers.

    References

    Alrabadi, N., Shawagfeh, S., Haddad, R., Mukattash, T., Abuhammad, S., Al-rabadi, D., Abu Farha, R., AlRabadi, S., & Al-Faouri, I. (2021). Medication errors: A focus on nursing practice. Journal of Pharmaceutical Health Services Research, 12(1), 78–86. https://doi.org/10.1093/jphsr/rmaa025 

    Catanzaro, M. T. (2022). Antibiotic stewardship for nurses: Using e-learning modules to bridge the education gap. Antimicrobial Stewardship & Healthcare Epidemiology, 2(1). https://doi.org/10.1017/ash.2021.216 

    Chiewchantanakit, D., Meakchai, A., Pituchaturont, N., Dilokthornsakul, P., & Dhippayom, T. (2019). The effectiveness of medication reconciliation to prevent medication error: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Research in Social and Administrative Pharmacy, 16(7). https://doi.org/10.1016/j.sapharm.2019.10.004 

    Hamad, M. M. E., & Bah, S. (2022). Impact of implementing electronic health records on medication safety at an himss stage 6 hospital: The pharmacist’s perspective. Canadian Journal of Hospital Pharmacy, 75(4), 267–275. https://doi.org/10.4212/cjhp.3223 

    Hawkins, S. F., & Morse, J. M. (2022). Untenable expectations: Nurses’ work in the context of medication administration, error, and the organization. Global Qualitative Nursing Research, 9, 233339362211317. https://doi.org/10.1177/23333936221131779 

    Lucas, S. R., Pollak, E., & Makowski, C. (2022). A failure in the medication delivery system-how disclosure and systems investigation improve patient safety. Journal of Healthcare Risk Management. https://doi.org/10.1002/jhrm.21529 

    Capella 4020 Assessment 4

    Murugappan, M. N., King-Kallimanis, B. L., Reaman, G. H., Bhatnagar, V., Horodniceanu, E. G., Bouchkouj, N., & Kluetz, P. G. (2021). Patient-reported outcomes in pediatric cancer registration trials: A US food and drug administration perspective. JNCI: Journal of the National Cancer Institute. https://doi.org/10.1093/jnci/djab087 

    Shan, Y., Shang, J., Yan, Y., & Ye, X. (2023). Workflow interruption and nurses’ mental workload in electronic health record tasks: An observational study. BMC Nursing, 22(1). https://doi.org/10.1186/s12912-023-01209-9 

    Trivedi, K. K., Schaffzin, J. K., Deloney, V. M., Aureden, K., Carrico, R., Garcia-Houchins, S., Garrett, J. H., Glowicz, J., Lee, G. M., Maragakis, L. L., Moody, J., Pettis, A. M., Saint, S., Schweizer, M. L., Yokoe, D. S., & Berenholtz, S. (2023). Implementing strategies to prevent infections in acute-care settings. Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, 1–15. https://doi.org/10.1017/ice.2023.103 

    Warren, C., Kramer, J., & Burgess, L. (2023). Operationalizing a Medication Safety Gap Assessment for a Large Health System. HCA Healthcare Journal of Medicine, 4(2). https://doi.org/10.36518/2689-0216.1566 

    Yeruva, A. R. (2023). Providing a personalized healthcare service to the patients using AIOPs monitoring. Eduvest – Journal of Universal Studies, 3(2), 327–334. https://doi.org/10.59188/eduvest.v3i2.742 

    Youmbi, K. V., Arya, A., Conger, A., Hood, D., Mai, J., Patel-House, S., & Then, M. (2023). Practical strategies for ensuring safety of medication overrides from automated dispensing cabinets. Journal of the American Pharmacists Association, 63(1), 193–197. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.japh.2022.09.015 

    Capella 4020 Assessment 4