Nurse Writing Services

Capella 4050 Assessment 2

New Samples

Struggling With Your Assessments? Get Help From Our Tutors

    Capella 4050 Assessment 2

    Capella 4050 Assessment 2 Ethical and Policy Factors in Care Coordination

    Student Name

    Capella University

    NURS-FPX 4050 Coord Patient-Centered Care

    Prof. Name

    Date

    Ethical and Policy Factors in Care Coordination

    Good morning, everyone. Nurses, in their role as care coordinators, have a critical responsibility to ensure that their patients receive optimal care. To achieve this, it is vital for nurses to have a sound knowledge of the ethical code of conduct for nurses, as well as the health policies that affect care coordination in their community. With a comprehensive understanding of ethical and policy considerations, nurses can navigate complex situations and make well-informed decisions that serve the best interests of their patients. This presentation will delve into the ethical and policy considerations that impact care coordination for religious groups in the local area. We will explore the distinct challenges and opportunities that emerge when providing care to patients belonging to these communities, and suggest ways to facilitate culturally sensitive and ethical care. 

    Navigating the Complexities of Coordinating Care under Governmental Policies

    The “Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA)” is a crucial way that government policies impact care coordination. This federal law establishes guidelines for safeguarding patients’ health information by setting standards for privacy and security. In the context of care coordination, complying with HIPAA is essential to ensure that patient information is only disclosed to those with a legitimate need to know (Bhate et al., 2020).

    In addition to HIPAA, there are other policies that affect the coordination of care for local religious groups. For example, Medicaid and Medicare are federal healthcare programs that provide healthcare coverage to millions of Americans. These programs are particularly important for vulnerable populations, such as elderly individuals and those with disabilities. Medicaid, on the other hand, provides coverage for long-term care services, which can be important for members of religious communities who may require ongoing assistance with daily activities. Therefore, Nurses who work with local religious groups must be aware of the specific policies that affect the populations they serve (Daniel-Robinson & Moore, 2019).

    Policy Provisions in Coordinating Care for Local Religious Groups

    The coordination of care for local religious groups is substantially impacted by the “Affordable Care Act (ACA),” a government policy. The ACA contains numerous provisions that influence the provision of healthcare services, such as preventative care. One of the most significant provisions of the ACA is the requirement for insurance companies to cover preventative services without charging copayments or coinsurance. This provision is particularly important for local religious groups that prioritize preventative care as a means of promoting health and wellbeing.

    Another policy that has an impact on care coordination for local religious groups is the 340B Drug Pricing Program. This program mandates that drug manufacturers offer discounts on outpatient medications to eligible healthcare providers, such as community health centers and hospitals that serve a significant number of low-income patients. The 340B program helps to alleviate the burden of medication expenses for patients who may not have insurance or are unable to afford to pay for their medications. This program is especially beneficial for religious groups that serve low-income communities and may struggle to provide necessary medications to their members (Huang & Chuang, 2020).

    Capella 4050 Assessment 2

    Governmental policies such as the ACA and the 340B program play a crucial role in the coordination of care for local religious groups. These policies provide essential resources and support to ensure that patients receive the best possible care. However, they also present challenges and complexities that require careful consideration and attention. For example, religious groups may struggle to navigate the complexities of insurance coverage and may face barriers to accessing care despite the availability of these policies (Schaefer, & Karen, 2021).

    Overall, understanding the impact of governmental policies on the coordination of care for local religious groups is essential for nurses and other healthcare providers. By understanding the intricacies of these policies, nurses can work to ensure that patients receive the care they need and deserve, regardless of their religious affiliation or economic status. Through careful attention to policy issues and ethical considerations, nurses can play a critical role in promoting health and wellbeing within their communities.

    Ethical Dilemmas in Care Coordination

    Healthcare policies can have significant ethical implications and consequences for care coordination. One such policy restricts access to healthcare services based on religious beliefs. Such a policy can create ethical concerns for nurses who work with local religious groups. Nurses may find themselves in a difficult position where they must balance their obligation to provide care with the religious beliefs of their patients. They must navigate this situation carefully to ensure that patients receive the best possible care while also respecting their religious beliefs.

    Similarly, policies that limit access to healthcare services for certain populations, such as undocumented immigrants, can create ethical dilemmas for nurses who prioritize equitable access to healthcare services. In such cases, nurses must balance their obligation to provide care to all patients with the policies of their organization or government. This can be challenging, especially if they feel that the policy is unjust or discriminatory (Jia et al., 2021).

    Capella 4050 Assessment 2

    Another ethical dilemma for care coordination is the conflict between patient autonomy and beneficence. Although patients possess the authority to make choices regarding their healthcare, circumstances may arise where these decisions do not serve their best interests. In such instances, nurses are responsible for balancing the principle of autonomy with the principle of beneficence, which requires them to act in the patient’s best interest. In such cases, nurses must engage in thoughtful and respectful communication with their patients to help them make informed decisions about their healthcare (Cheraghi et al., 2023).

    So, healthcare policies can have significant ethical implications and consequences for care coordination. However, nurses must be aware of these implications and strive to level their obligations to patients with the policies of their organization or government. Ultimately, their goal must be to provide the best possible care to all patients, while also respecting their rights and beliefs.

    Ethical Codes for Nurses

    The ethical duties of nurses are outlined in a set of standards called the Code of Ethics for Nurses. The code emphasizes the importance of patient advocacy, cultural competence, and professional responsibility. Nurses who work with local religious groups must be familiar with the code of ethics and should strive to incorporate its principles into their practice (Boulanger et al., 2020).

    Ethical Codes for Nurses and Their Impact on Coordination and Continuum of Care

    The coordination and continuum of care for local religious groups are significantly influenced by the code of ethics for nurses. The principles of patient advocacy and cultural competence are particularly important for nurses who work with local religious groups. Nurses must be able to advocate for their patients and ensure that their cultural beliefs and practices are respected (Hwang & Chang, 2019).

    When it comes to care coordination for local religious groups, there are several ethical and policy factors that must be considered. One of the most important factors is the cultural beliefs and practices of these groups. Local religious groups may have unique beliefs and practices that influence their health and healthcare decisions. A recent study found that cultural competence training programs can improve nurses’ ability to provide culturally competent care to local religious groups. The study concluded that these training programs should be integrated into nursing education to ensure that all nurses have the necessary skills to provide high-quality care to patients from diverse cultural backgrounds. Nurses and other healthcare providers must be sensitive to these beliefs and practices to provide culturally competent care (Lau & Rodgers, 2021). 

    Capella 4050 Assessment 2

    Another important factor to consider is access to healthcare services. Healthcare policies that limit access to services based on religious beliefs can create ethical concerns for nurses. They must balance the principles of respect for religious beliefs with their obligation to provide the best possible care to patients (Boulanger et al., 2020).

    Furthermore, social determinants of health, such as poverty, housing, and education, can play a significant role in the health outcomes of local religious groups. Care coordination efforts must take into account these factors and strive to address them to improve health outcomes and reduce health disparities. As an example, it is recommended that nurses and healthcare professionals collaborate with community organizations and social workers to identify and resolve obstacles to obtaining healthcare services, such as inadequate transportation, language barriers, and financial difficulties. By doing so, they can ensure that patients from local religious groups have equal access to healthcare services, regardless of their social and economic status. (Huang & Chuang, 2020).

    Conclusion

    In conclusion, the ethical and policy aspects of care coordination for local religious groups necessitate a careful and sophisticated approach. Nurses and other healthcare providers must be sensitive to the cultural beliefs and practices of these groups while also working to address social determinants of health that impact their health outcomes. By doing so, they can provide effective, equitable, and compassionate care to all patients.

    References

    Bhate, C., Ho, C. H., & Brodell, R. T. (2020). Time to revisit the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA)? Accelerated telehealth adoption during the COVID-19 pandemic. Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, 83(4), e313. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jaad.2020.06.989.

    Boulanger, J., Blair, L., Hirsch, J., & Harwood, J. (2019). Identifying patients with complex care needs in primary care using electronic health record data: A systematic review. Journal of Comorbidity, 9, 2235042X1984991. https://doi.org/10.1177/2235042X19849916.

    Cheraghi, R., Valizadeh, L., Zamanzadeh, V., Hassankhani, H., & Jafarzadeh, A. (2023). Clarification of ethical principle of the beneficence in nursing care: an integrative review. BMC nursing, 22(1), 1-9. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12912-023-01246-4 

    Daniel-Robinson, L., & Moore, J. E. (2019). Innovation and opportunities to address social determinants of health in Medicaid managed care. Institute for Medicaid Innovation, 1-24. .https://doi.org/10.1016/j.healthpol.2009.12.005.

    Hwang, D., & Chang, Y. (2019). Effects of nursing interventions on the self-esteem, depression, and quality of life of hospitalized elderly patients: A quasi-experimental study. Journal of Korean Academy of Nursing, 49(6), 682-694. https://doi.org/10.4040/jkan.2019.49.6.682.

    Huang, C. T., Li, J. H., Li, H. C., & Chuang, Y. H. (2020). Interprofessional collaboration in health and social care: A systematic review and meta-synthesis of conceptual models and frameworks. Journal of Interprofessional Care, 34(3), 332-342. https://doi.org/10.1080/13561820.2019.1705305.

    Jia, Y., Chen, O., Xiao, Z., Xiao, J., Bian, J., & Jia, H. (2021). Nurses’ ethical challenges caring for people with COVID-19: a qualitative study. Nursing ethics, 28(1), 33-45.

    https://doi.org/10.1177/0969733020944453

    Lau, L. S., & Rodgers, G. (2021). Cultural competence in refugee service settings: a scoping review. Health Equity, 5(1), 124-134. https://doi.org/10.1089/heq.2020.0094 

    Schaefer, Karen Mulligan. (2021). The 340B drug pricing program: a critical review. American Journal of Health-System Pharmacy, 78(3), 171-178. https://doi.org/10.1093/ajhp/zxaa467.

    Capella 4050 Assessment 2